Thankgiving Eve report.

D and I are having our first Thanksgiving in our own home this year. We’re so tired of traveling (and poor) that it seemed ideal to hole up in Fayetteville and use some of our new kitchenware. To that effect, here’s the menu for tomorrow:

Roast turkey with stuffing (turkey from Richard’s Meat Market, the best market in Fayetteville; stuffing recipe courtesy of “Good Eats”)

Mashed sweet potatoes with chipotle (also from “Good Eats”)

Braised mustard greens with ham (Sarah Moulton’s recipe)

Cranberries (my mom’s recipe)

Apple crumble (I don’t remember—Paula Deen?)

So, yes, everything I know about cooking I learned from my parents or from the Food Network. And I think that’s okay. Although if you believe everything Alton Brown tells you, you’ll find yourself scouring your hometown’s supermarkets and Wal-Marts the day before Thanksgiving looking for a freaking organic cotton bag to stuff your stuffing in before stuffing it in the turkey, and you will be unsuccessful and have to settle for just stuffing the stuffing in the bird the way people have been doing it for generations. D is a little worried I’m going to poison us all with all this stuffing business but I have assured him that I am armed with two probe thermometers and Alton Brown has shown me how to use them.

D is also making homemade challah right now for my stuffing recipe because we live in a place with no Jewish population and hence no challah. Surreal.

We read somewhere the other day that the reason people call stuffing “dressing” down here is that some women’s magazine way back when thought the term “stuffing” was inappropriately pornographic. I think that’s awesome.

Happy Thanksgiving!

11 thoughts on “Thankgiving Eve report.

  1. Just don’t stuff the bird the night before, and you should be okay on the poisoning front (or at the very least you’ve given me an idea for next year at the inlaws). 😉 I keep reading these things about Thanksgiving cooking disasters and going “do people actually DO that?” (like stuffing the bird the night before) and am assured that they do.

    some women’s magazine way back when thought the term “stuffing” was inappropriately pornographic. I think that’s awesome.

    Me too! Conjures up all kinds of fabulous images…

  2. We read somewhere the other day that the reason people call stuffing “dressing” down here is that some women’s magazine way back when thought the term “stuffing” was inappropriately pornographic. I think that’s awesome.

    Nonsense. It’s very simple (and logical, when you think about it): stuffing is cooked inside the bird. Dressing is cooked outside the bird and then served with it afterward (thus, it “dresses” the bird).

    One must always have dressing, because with the possible exception of the ostrich– which no one else in my family would even begin to consider eating on Thanksgiving– the bird that has a cavity big enough for the amount of stuffing required at and after Thanksgiving has not yet been born. Between the people in this family– just the immediate family, the ones we will be seeing tomorrow– eighteen pounds of bread is being used to make dressing. (And since we all have turkey breasts, zero pounds will be stuffing.) I can’t guarantee any will be left on Friday.

    • Yes—that does make a lot of sense. But it’s less funny. 😦

      I anticipate we will have plenty of both stuffing and dressing, because I am making enough food for a whole family, even though it’s just the two of us. D’s family never had dressing (or stuffing) on Thanksgiving, apparently. I’m making up for years of deprivation.

      • D’s family never had dressing (or stuffing) on Thanksgiving, apparently.

        I weep for him. I could eat nothing but dressing (and a few crudites) at Thanksgiving and be perfectly happy. (And with all the dressing we’ve got this year, I may actually be able to do this.)

        I’m doing a pumpernickel stuffing with sausage. Everyone else is doing the regular white bread and herbs. Ah, glorious bread.

        Wish I’d thought to get pumpkin bread to do a pumpkin bread pudding for dessert.

      • I spent days trying to come up with a combination of flavors that would stand up to pumpernickel in stuffing. And, on the off chance that someone else is going to eat it, I still had to compromise; I want to go with chorizo or linguica, something with some spice that would really shine, but no one else int he family likes hot stuff. sigh. I’m gonna be rollin’ with the spices, though. Fennel, sage, thyme, parsley, all sitting in the fridge waiting to be chopped. And oregano. Why can I never find fresh oregano?

        (Trying to decide whether to throw in a handful of chopped chives as well, since I have more than I’ll need for the mashed potato and celery root.)

        And it somewhat confuses me that there are still parts of the country where one cannot find challah. It’s not like I live in an area with a high concentration of Jews (for some reason, most Cleveland-area Jews concentrated in a few suburbs on the east side), but I can get challah at any decent-sized grocery store.

      • And it somewhat confuses me that there are still parts of the country where one cannot find challah.

        I know, right? Yesterday’s shopping trip was totally surreal. Also, at one supermarket, I asked the produce guy if they had dried mushrooms and he looked at me like I was certifiable.

      • Also, at one supermarket, I asked the produce guy if they had dried mushrooms and he looked at me like I was certifiable.

        New megamart down the street from me has a mushroom wall. Oh, my good lord. If I could actually afford $14/pound, I’d be in heaven.

        Pumpernickel stuffing needs some herb adjustment, I made the bread pieces way too large, and it definitely needs a more robust sausage (another excuse to use chorizo!), but the theory is sound. This is going to be a regular addition to the dinner table, I think…

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s